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What is a D.O.?

If you are like most people, you’ve been going to a doctor ever since you were born, and perhaps were not aware whether you were seeing a DO (Osteopathic Physician) or an M.D. (Allopathic Physician). You may not even be aware that there are two types of complete physicians in the United States.

While Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.s) and Medical Doctors (M.D.s) in the United States are alike in many ways, D.O.s bring something extra to medicine.

Plus, both predoctoral and postdoctoral training programs include osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). This additional specialized training provides D.O.s with a therapeutic and diagnostic advantage.

 

Osteopathic physicians perform surgery, deliver babies and prescribe medicine in hospitals and clinics across the nation. Whether they’re family doctors or specialists, osteopathic physicians use all the tools of modern medicine and more.

 

They help their patients develop attitudes and lifestyles that don’t just fight illness, but prevent it. They give special attention to how the body’s nerves, muscles, bones and organs work together to influence health. And through OMT, they can use their hands to diagnose injury and illness-and encourage the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

 

Those D.O.s who belong to the American Academy of Osteopathy are especially devoted to practicing osteopathic medicine according to the philosophy and principles established by Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., the founder of osteopathic medicine. Dissatisfaction with nineteenth century medicine led Dr. Still to form a new system of health care based on ideas dating back to Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine. His philosophy emphasized the unity of all body parts, the importance of the musculoskeletal system in maintaining health, and the body’s innate abilities that, if given the opportunity, will establish balance and recreate health.

 

By combining OMT with other modern medical procedures and technology available to physicians, osteopathic physicians offer their patients a comprehensive total approach to health care.

What is the difference between an M.D. and a D.O.?

The fact is that both D.O.’s and M.D.’s are fully qualified physicians licensed to perform surgery and prescribe medication. Is there a difference between these two kinds of doctors? Yes. And No.

D.O.’s and M.D.’s are Alike in Many Ways.

  • Applicants to both D.O. and M.D. medical colleges typically have a four-year undergraduate degree with an emphasis in scientific courses.

  • Both D.O.’s and M.D.’s complete four years of basic medical education.

  • After medical school, both D.O.’s and M.D.’s can choose to practice in a specialty area of medicine, such as pediatrics, family practice , psychiatry, surgery or obstetrics, after completing a residency program (typically 2-6 years of additional training).

  • Both D.O.’s and M.D.’s must pass comparable state licensing examinations.

  • D.O.’s and M.D.’s both practice in fully accredited and licensed health care facilities

D.O.’s comprise a separate yet equal branch of American medical care. Together, D.O.’s and M.D.’s enhance the state of care available in America. However, it is the ways that D.O.’s and M.D.’s are different that can bring an extra dimension to you and your family’s health care.

D.O.’s bring something extra to medicine

  • Osteopathic medical schools emphasisze training students to be primary care physicians.

  • D.O.’s practice a “whole person” approach to medicine. Instead of just treating specific symptoms or illnesses, they regard your body as an integrated whole.

  • Osteopathic physicians focus on preventative health care.

  • D.O.’s receive extra training in the musculoskeletal system – your body’s interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones that make up two-thirds of its body mass. This training provides osteopathic physicians with a better understanding of the ways that an injury or illness in one part of your body can affect another.

  • Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is incorporated in the training and practice of osteopathic physicians. With OMT, osteopathic physicians use their hands to diagnose injury and illness, and to encourage your body’s natural tendency toward good health. By combining all available medical procedures with OMT, D.O.’s offer their patients the most comprehensive medical care available in medicine today.

What is a D.O.?

While Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.s) and Medical Doctors (M.D.s) in the United States are alike in many ways, D.O.s bring something extra to medicine.

 

Osteopathic medical schools emphasize training students to be primary care physicians. They also receive additional training in the musculoskeletal system for a better understanding of how an injury or illness in one part of the body can affect other body parts and systems. Plus, both predoctoral and postdoctoral training programs include osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). This additional specialized training provides D.O.s with a therapeutic and diagnostic advantage.

 

Osteopathic physicians perform surgery, deliver babies and prescribe medicine in hospitals and clinics across the nation. Whether they’re family doctors or specialists, osteopathic physicians use all the tools of modern medicine and more.

 

They help their patients develop attitudes and lifestyles that don’t just fight illness, but prevent it. They give special attention to how the body’s nerves, muscles, bones and organs work together to influence health. And through OMT, they can use their hands to diagnose injury and illness-and encourage the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

 

Those D.O.s who belong to the American Academy of Osteopathy are especially devoted to practicing osteopathic medicine according to the philosophy and principles established by Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., the founder of osteopathic medicine. Dissatisfaction with nineteenth century medicine led Dr. Still to form a new system of health care based on ideas dating back to Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine. His philosophy emphasized the unity of all body parts, the importance of the musculoskeletal system in maintaining health, and the body’s innate abilities that, if given the opportunity, will establish balance and recreate health.

 

By combining OMT with other modern medical procedures and technology available to physicians, osteopathic physicians offer their patients a comprehensive total approach to health care.

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